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« The Yin, the Yang, and the Bang-Bang | Main | China's Auto Reform: One Foot on the Gas, One Foot On the Brake »

March 01, 2009

Comments

Steven

These are great points.

Regarding Media, do you think anything will be mentioned about the plans for the much talked about International CNN-style English news network (i.e. for out-ward looking/opening up emphasis)?

Also, the Beijing Olympics were obviously a national focus in 2008. Do you think the Shanghai Expo will be any part of the talks of CPPCC?

Keep up good posts.

Robert Ness

What fascinates me is what seems to be gradual acceptance that the old foreign policy of non-interference is more and more untenable as China's role in the world/China's global strategic resource grab becomes more established and understood by politicos outside the Foreign Ministry. I will watching for songs of that tune, as well as anything that addresses the paradox of making life hard for small businesses when employment and indigenous innovation are said to be of such importance.

David

Steven, I think the Shanghai Expo is, for the purposes of the CPPCC, a pretty much done deal. There is not much to be said with the exception of perhaps a general statement of support that the organizers would love to have from senior leaders.

The international media plans may well be mentioned, particularly since they involve a fairly large outlay. If so, I expect it will be to justify them, and as such they will be framed in terms of China's need to make itself understood to the outside world and to begin using the tools of soft power in its Peaceful Rise.

At the same time, I think it is possible that we will hear more about space and about supposed plans to expand the navy.

David

Robert, good points. I'd bet they put off addressing the paradox. This is an extremely sensitive period to begin publicly rethinking your own rhetoric about non-interference. I think you might be about 12 months ahead of your time, as this sounds like something best addressed after the Triple Anniversary year and after the economy is more firmly on the growth track again.

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